Tag Archives: smart phone security

All about Faraday Bags: Faraday bags is a way to protect phone from any hack

A Faraday bag is a type of Faraday cage. It protects electronics from being damaged by radio frequency interference (RFI) or from an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) by not allowing radio frequency or electromagnetic pulse waves to pass through the material.

It goes by a lot of names such as RFID bag, RFID blocking bag, or EMP bag.

How a Faraday bag works?

It creates a completely enclosed space that is surrounded by a mesh of conducting materials. When an electrical field on the outside of the Faraday cage interacts with the material, it causes the charges within the protected space to be distributed in a way that cancels the effects. It also works to protect against radio frequency interference.

This way the hackers, thieves, or government agencies who are trying to track your phone or any other device will not be able to get to it because of the outer layer of the Faraday bag.

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https://privacypros.io/faraday-bags/

Siri and Google Assistant hacked in new ultrasonic attack

Abstract

Voice assistants – the demo targeted Siri, Google Assistant, and Bixby – are designed to respond when they detect the owner’s voice after noticing a trigger phrase such as ‘Ok, Google’.

Ultimately, commands are just sound waves, which other researchers have already shown can be emulated using ultrasonic waves which humans can’t hear, providing an attacker has a line of sight on the device and the distance is short.

What SurfingAttack adds to this is the ability to send the ultrasonic commands through a solid glass or wood table on which the smartphone was sitting using a circular piezoelectric disc connected to its underside.

Although the distance was only 43cm (17 inches), hiding the disc under a surface represents a more plausible, easier-to-conceal attack method than previous techniques.

As explained in a video showcasing the method, a remote laptop generates voice commands using text-to-speech (TTS) Module to produce simulated voice commands which are then transmitted to the disc using Wi-Fi or Bluetooth.

The researchers tested the method on 17 different smartphones models from Apple, Google, Samsung, Motorola, Xiaomi, and Huawei, successfully deploying SurfingAttack against 15 of them.

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