Category Archives: Cyber Security

FBI 2020 Elder Fraud Report : 1 Billion loss

In 2020, IC3 received a total of 791,790 complaints with reported losses exceeding $4.1 billion. Based on the information provided in the complaints, approximately 28% of the total fraud losses were sustained by victims over the age of 60, resulting in approximately $1 billion in losses to seniors. This represents an increase of approximately $300 million in losses reported in 2020 versus what was reported by victims over 60 in 2019.

The initial contact in a lottery/sweepstakes scam is often a call, an email, a social media notification, or a piece of mail offering congratulations for winning a big contest, lottery, or sweepstakes the victim did not enter. To claim their prize, the victim is required to pay upfront fees and taxes. Subjects often request the payments be made via wire transfers or prepaid cards. Often, the scammers will ask for a victim’s banking information to transfer their winnings.

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Security company exec and founder charged with facilitating cyber attack on Georgia hospital

Abstract

Chris Hacker, an FBIsSpecial agent at the Atlanta field office said the 2018 attack “not only could have had disastrous consequences, but patients’ personal information was also compromised.”

The indictment describes Singla as “chief operating officer for a network security company” at the time of the attack but does not name the company. According to Singla’s public LinkedIn profile, he has been chief operating officer for the Atlanta, Georgia-based security firm Securolytics since 2016. A profile of the company on Crunchbase listsSingla as one of two founders of the firm.

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https://www.scmagazine.com/home/health-care/security-company-exec-and-founder-charged-with-facilitating-cyber-attack-on-georgia-hospital/

Be careful of using Chinese goods: Chinese smart TVs caught hoovering up data

Abstract

Millions of smart TVs in China may have collected data without the knowledge of viewers about Wi-Fi networks found within range and attached devices.

According to the South China Morning Post, an owner of a Skyworth smart TV posted last month on a Chinese technical forum that their suspicions were aroused when they felt their TV’s operation had slowed down, and wondered what background processes might be running.

The unnamed user examined the code running on his Android-powered Skyworth TV, and discovered it was scanning for devices connected to their family’s Wi-Fi every 10 minutes, scooping up information:

What do they collect?

“TV App installed in users TV sends back the hostname, mac, ip and even the network delay time. It also detects the surrounding wifi SSID names, The mac address is also packaged and sent to this domain name of gz-data.com.” GZ-Data.com is the domain name of Gozen Data, a data analytics company that specializes in delivering targeted advertising to smart TVs.

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https://www.bitdefender.com/box/blog/iot-news/chinese-smart-tvs-caught-hoovering-data-devices-customers-networks/

Good Read: Search Yourself Online

Abstract

You most likely have heard how important it is to protect your privacy and the information you share online. To demonstrate this, we are going to try something new; we are going to show you how to research yourself and discover what information is publicly known about you. The process is called OSINT, a fancy way of saying Open Source Intelligence.

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https://www.sans.org/newsletters/ouch/search-yourself-online/

Good Read: API First Security Strategy

Every software in the world is either an API or uses API. API (Application programming interface) has enabled the world to connect digitally and advances the broader use of IoT devices.

As APIs’ popularity rises, so does their prevalence as an attack vector for cybercriminals because bad actors have always loved the most target-rich technologies. Gartner forecasts that APIs will become the most common attack vector by next year. Yet despite higher awareness of the need for API security, breaches continue to happen.

Abstract

What does an API-first security strategy look like? Here are five observations:

1. High visibility is crucial. An API-first approach is all about acknowledging the API as a first-class citizen in an application’s design. Given the increase in vital work that the API does in communicating between applications, APIs must have the same scrutiny of access controls that a superuser (e.g., an IT administrative specialist with unlimited privileges) would.

2. REST APIs are a growing target. REST (REpresentational State Transfer) is the duct tape of technology — it defines how systems can be connected to (and interact with) each other by using HTTP requests to access and use data. REST API usage has become so widespread in enterprise application development that many companies have difficulties defining a clear picture of all their deployments. These visibility gaps make APIs harder to protect.

3. Encryption of all data is key. This is true not just when data is at rest, but also in transit. In this encryption scenario, the API would use TLS and authorization tokens to transmit data securely, and the data that the API is accessing should also be encrypted.

4. Credential stuffing is still a huge problem and an evolving threat. Credential stuffing is the practice of using an automated injection of stolen credentials to gain unauthorized access. Companies have gotten better at securing their front-end applications and webpages to defend against credential stuffing. Still, hackers increasingly have been targeting back-end APIs that historically tended to have fewer implemented security controls.

5. Automated checks should be standard practice. I’m seeing how rarely I see automated security checks as part of a CI/CD pipeline, if they are implemented at all. A mature application security team should work with the engineering squads to design and incorporate security into pipelines and allow an organization to scale security with its product offerings.

Reference

https://www.darkreading.com/application-security/5-objectives-for-establishing-an-api-first-security-strategy/a/d-id/1340622?_mc=rss_x_drr_edt_aud_dr_x_x-rss-simple