Good Read: MIME Sniffing in Browsers and the Security Implications

Whenever a website in opened in a browser, there are many tasks that are being silently performed in the background. One of those tasks is fetching resources such as images, stylesheets and JavaScript from different domains on the internet and then parsing those resources.

For example, a browser fetches an image from remote server and renders it for display when it encounters an <img> tag with src attribute in an HTML document. Browsers handle these resources based on their MIME type, and a browser’s behavior can be guided by the X-Content-Type-Options HTTP header returned by the web server.

In this post, we are going to look at security risks for an application that does not make use of this header. Specifically, we will look at the conditions under which exploitable vulnerabilities arise.

MIME Sniffing Introduction

MIME stands for “Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions.” MIME was originally defined to support non-ASCII text and non-text binaries in email. However, the content types defined in MIME standard are used in HTTP protocol to define the type of content in a request or response. 

A browser usually identifies a resource’s MIME type by observing the Content-Type response header in an HTTP response. 

Figure 1:Content-Type response header for an HTML page from google.com

Sometimes, developers set values for Content-Type headers that are not appropriate for the response’s content. For example, if a server sends text/plain value for a JavaScript resource, it is a mismatch. As per web standards, text/plain is not a valid JavaScript MIME type. However, browsers may parse and render such misrepresented resources so that the website will operate as intended. This is where MIME sniffing comes into picture. An example has been given in Figure 2.  

Figure 2: A JavaScript resource served with incorrect Content-Type value

 “MIME sniffing” can be broadly defined as the practice adopted by browsers to determine the effective MIME type of a web resource by examining the content of the response instead of relying on the Content-Type header. MIME sniffing is performed only under specific conditions. Please note that MIME sniffing algorithms vary by browser. A MIME sniffing standard has been defined on the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) website. 

Read more in

https://www.denimgroup.com/resources/blog/2019/05/mime-sniffing-in-browsers-and-the-security-implications/



Categories: Cyber Security, web application security, web security

Tags: ,

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