Top of the Cyber News

New Russian Law Requires Devices Sold Have Russian Software Pre-Installed(November 21, 2019)
 Russia’s parliament has passed a law that would prohibit the sale of certain electronic devices that do not have Russian software pre-installed. The law affects smartphones, computers, and smart TVs. Devices made in other countries may be sold with their own software, but the Russian software must be installed as well. While the law has been touted as promoting Russian software and making devices easier to use in that country, some are concerned that the law will increase surveillance.

Read more in:
– www.bbc.com
: Russia bans sale of gadgets without Russian-made software

Critical Flaws in Oracle E-Business Suite(November 19 & 20, 2019)
 A pair of critical vulnerabilities in Oracle’s E-Business Suite (EBS) could be exploited to print checks and conduct electronic funds transfers. Oracle released fixes for the flaws in its April 2019 Critical Patch Update. The Onapsis researchers that found the flaws and reported them to Oracle in December 2018 estimate that about half of Oracle EBS customers have not yet applied the fixes.

The Best Cybersecurity Book of 2019: Sandworm: A New Era of CyberWar

Sandworm answers the questions security people need answered about how the most damaging cyber attacks of the past three years happened, who was at fault, and perhaps most importantly, what did the victims not do that would have protected them. What makes it this year’s “best book” is the way it takes the reader inside discussions with the people who actually discovered and deciphered the attacks as well as discussions with the victims. Written by one of America’s “10 Top Cyber Journalists,” Andy Greenberg, Sandworm is an in-person tour of the battlefield with face to face discussions with each of the people you would want to talk to. Just amazing!
Read more in:
– www.cyberscoop.com
: ‘Sandworm’ book review: To understand cyberwar, you must understand Ukraine

Texas School District Pays Ransomware Demand(November 18, 2019)
 The Port Neches-Groves Independent School District in Texas has paid an undisclosed sum in Bitcoin to regain access to their files that were encrypted by ransomware. The district’s director of information services said that as of Monday, November 18, staff had regained access to nearly all files.
Read more in:
– www.beaumontenterprise.com: PN-G pays ransom to regain access to district file

Veterinary Practices Hit with Ransomware(November 19 & 20, 2019)
 A ransomware attack affected computers at California-based National Veterinary Associates (NVA), causing problems at roughly 400 of the company’s veterinary practices and animal boarding facilities around the world. NVA discovered the attack on October 27 and hired two companies to help with the recovery. The attack affected patient records, payment systems, and office management software. The company did not say if it paid the ransom.
Read more in:
– krebsonsecurity.com
: Ransomware Bites 400 Veterinary Hospitals

French Hospital’s Computers Infected with Ransomware(November 21, 2019)
 A hospital in Rouen, France, was the victim of a ransomware attack that occurred on Friday, November 15. While the 6,000 computers were unavailable, healthcare providers at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) resorted to pen and paper. CHU said that the incident has caused “very long delays in care.” According to Le Monde, France’s cybercrime agency ANSSI helped contain the effects of the attack and helped with the recovery.
Read more in:
– www.bbc.com
: Rouen hospital turns to pen and paper after cyber-attack

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